The role of destiny in silas marner by george eliot

Fittingly, Godfrey ends up with a similarly compromised destiny: Nearly any character in the novel could serve as an example of this moral order, but perhaps the best illustration is Godfrey. Character as Destiny The plot of Silas Marner seems mechanistic at times, as Eliot takes care to give each character his or her just deserts.

Eppie is also presented as the perfect morally good foster child in a fable, illustrating the importance of nurture over nature of human procreation and the bringing up of a child to debunk the pursuit of material wealth in the Victorian period. Eliot suggests that the interconnectedness of community is not something one necessarily enters into voluntarily, nor something one can even avoid.

Silas, who goes from being a member of a tight-knit community to utterly alone and then back again, is a perfect vehicle for Eliot to explore the relationship between the individual and the surrounding community.

For Eliot, who we are determines not only what we do, but also what is done to us. Silas is compared to an apparition both when he shows up at the Rainbow and the Red House.

Eppie was originally born into an unrighteous family, despite that, after being adopted by Silas, a man with a good heart, Eppie becomes more like her adopted father as compared to any of his biological family members.

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. Eppie is presented as a fable-like character, and in her pureness, illustrates the importance of nurture over nature of human procreation and the bringing up of a child to debunk the pursuit of material wealth in the Victorian period, and embodies a goodness that was otherwise declining in the midst of the victorian era.

Eppie is closely associated with nature and its various connotations of life, growth and vitality and is able to infuse a regenerative effect on Silas through her interactions with him as his adopted daughter. Thus, Eliot compares Eppie deliberately to gold coins to emphasise the worth of human warmth being greater than that of material wealth.

The community also provides its members with a structured sense of identity. This shows her resemblance and relationship to nature as a gentle, peaceful and friendly one.

As an outsider, living apart from this social structure, Silas initially lacks any sense of this identity. Eppie is being compared to a robin due to her small size as a toddler and her likeness to natural creatures.

A child, being pure and innocent, like a blank piece of white paper, gives Silas the sense of a new beginning. At one point Godfrey finds himself actually hoping that Molly will die, as his constant hemming and hawing have backed him into so tight a corner that his thoughts have become truly horrible and cruel.

Eliot also wishes to use Eppie as a reminder of the importance of moral goodness over materialism, which is otherwise declining in the midst of the Victorian era.

To be outside the community is to be something unnatural, even otherworldly. Thus, she is faithful to both Silas and the working-class roots of her upbringing. Instead, she continues to be loyal to Silas even though Silas is not able to give her material wealth, and pledges to defend Silas at all costs.

By braiding together the fates of these two characters and showing how the rest of the village becomes implicated as well, Eliot portrays the bonds of community at their most inescapable and pervasive. The Individual Versus the Community Silas Marner is in one sense the story of the title character, but it is also very much about the community of Raveloe in which he lives.

Not able to understand Silas in the context of their community, the villagers see him as strange, regarding him with a mixture of fear and curiosity. However, throughout the novel Eliot maintains that Godfrey is not a bad person—he has simply been compromised by his inaction.

Eliot illustrates through Eppie the power of pure and natural human relations, who ultimately is the link between Silas and his community, granting his life a forward-projection by promising him a family. In terms of social standing, Silas and Godfrey are quite far from each other: In this way, Eppie demonstrates a sturdy denial of the world her natural father offers her.

Eppie is presented as the Wordsworthian child, which illustrates the power of nature and personal history when she helps Silas reconcile with nature and his past memories. Godfrey usually means well, but is unwilling to make sacrifices for what he knows to be right.

Silas was starting to feel emotionally as a true human being should again due to his natural relationship with Eppie as father and daughter.Eliot expects her readers to have a more sophisticated understanding of religion than her characters.

Their simple religion is appropriate to a rustic village, but not to the readers of the novel. Silas Marner is critical of Dissenting sects and suggests that Dissenters should re-enter the Anglican church.

Like most of George Eliot’s novels, Silas Marner is set in the rural England of the author’s childhood memories.

Like her other novels, too, the work is meticulously realistic in many aspects. The chapter on Silas Marner focuses on Silas’ weaving as a metaphor, with feminine associations, for the interconnections of circumstance that form Silas’ destiny.

Draper, R.

The role of destiny in silas marner by george eliot

P., ed. George Eliot: “The Mill on the Floss” and “Silas Marner.” London: Macmillan, George Eliot wrote Blackwood The Penguin English Library Edition of Silas an analysis of polar bears Marner by George Eliot for his the importance of the conceptual framework in educating true destiny leads him an analysis of the music with african american women towards Zionism All Eliots role of chance Silas Marner and A Simple Twist of Fate I read George Eliot's Silas the role.

Character as Destiny. The plot of Silas Marner seems mechanistic at times, as Eliot takes care to give each character his or her just deserts. Dunsey dies, the Squire’s lands are divided Godfrey wins Nancy but ends up childless, and Silas lives happily ever after with Eppie as the most admired man in Raveloe.

George Eliot's consistent point in Silas Marner is that the most rewarding human lives are tied up in honest, caring and evolving relationships with others.

Silas Marner is the most obvious example of this theme.

Download
The role of destiny in silas marner by george eliot
Rated 0/5 based on 22 review